Melting Pot’s Coq au Vin Fondue Copycat Recipe

This is a Melting Pot Coq au Vin fondue copycat. It’s a chicken broth fondue recipe that takes the classic flavors of Coq au Vin and turns it into a fun dining experience.

A fondue fork with a piece of shrimp over a red fondue pot of liquid next to bowls of vegetables, steak, chicken, and ravioli

I believe fondue parties should make a comeback. They are so fun for your family and guests.

My family and I vacation to bigger cities during the summer months and Melting Pot restaurant is always our favorite fondue place to visit.

We have always ordered the Coq au vin cooking style for our meat fondue.

They serve an entire meal with fondue. A cheese course, meat main course, and dessert. There’s also a salad served in between.

There isn’t a Melting Pot or other fondue restaurant where I live so I like to recreate it at home.

Fondue has been a tradition for me to serve on New Year’s Eve since I was little. My grandmother would bring out her fondue pot and we always enjoyed cooking in oil. However, once we started visiting the Melting Pot on vacations I found a love of cooking in broth fondue.

An overhead view of a red fondue pot with brown liquid, a green bowl of chopped steak, an orange bowl of ravioli, two bowls with red sauce and spoons, a white platter of broccoli, carrots, mushrooms, and a dark plate with the prepared ingredients and fondue forks

It’s perfect for bringing in the new year, especially if you have friends and family over for a dinner party to celebrate.

If you have guests who are willing, you could ask each one to bring their own individual pieces of desired meat to share at the table. This can cut the burden of prepping down and you’ll know your guests will enjoy cooking their favorites.

I also have a classic beer cheese fondue and Swiss cheese fondue recipe that I highly recommend serving before the Coq au Vin fondue.

Fondue is a great dinner idea for Christmas, a romantic dinner for Valentine’s Day, an anniversary treat, or in my case, I also had it as a 17th birthday surprise dinner many years ago.

Fondue is not just a fancy meal for adults.

Kids love it! It’s a good way to show them how to cook their own food. Kids think it’s so neat to put their fondue forks in the pot and watch it cook. I first started cooking fondue at the age of 7 years old.

A side view of a red fondue pot with brown liquid, a green bowl of chopped steak, an orange bowl of ravioli, two bowls with red sauce and spoons, a white platter of broccoli, carrots, mushrooms, and a dark plate with the prepared ingredients and fondue forks

If you are planning this for a party and doing larger quantities as I did, I recommend prepping the day before.

All of your meat and vegetables will do well in the refrigerator. The meat will have a chance to marinade too.

The bulk of this meal is spent in the prepping and not the cooking since your guests will be cooking for themselves.

At Melting Pot, they have this amazing Coq au Vin fondue to cook meat in that’s really delicious. I have replicated this fondue for you to try! It flavors your meat as it cooks and is so savory. 

We tend to dump all of our vegetables into the pot right from the get-go because it takes a little longer for those to cook. That is one thing I recommend about this recipe: put your veggies in the pot first and get that cooking. The meat can cook around them.

Season all of your meat and vegetables before cooking. Yes, some seasoning and marinade come off in the pot. This is normal and only adds to the broth flavor.

A dinner table with red wine in wine glasses, a platter of meat and vegetables in the center, mini dishes of sauces, two red fondue pots, and black plates

Meat Fondue Broth Vs Oil

Meat Fondue Broth

  • Flavor Infusion: Broth allows you to infuse the meat with a variety of flavors. You can create a flavorful broth by adding herbs, spices, vegetables, and aromatics such as garlic and onions.
  • Healthier Option: Broth is generally considered a healthier option compared to oil, as it is lower in fat and calories. It’s a good choice for those looking for a lighter fondue experience.
  • Versatility: You have the flexibility to experiment with different broths, making it suitable for a variety of meats, including chicken, beef, and seafood.
  • No Splattering: Broth doesn’t splatter like hot oil does, making it safer and easier to manage, especially if children are participating.

Oil Fondue

  • Crispy Texture: Cooking meat in hot oil results in a crispy and golden-brown exterior, providing a different texture compared to broth-cooked meat.
  • Quick Cooking: Oil has high heat conductivity, so it cooks meat quickly. This can be an advantage if you prefer a shorter cooking time.
  • Wide Range of Meats: Oil is suitable for cooking a wide range of meats, including beef, chicken, pork, and even seafood. It’s particularly popular for cooking small, bite-sized pieces.
  • Traditional and Classic: Oil fondue is often considered a more traditional and classic method, and it’s the method typically associated with fondue in many cultures.
An overhead view of a red fondue pot with brown liquid, a green bowl of chopped steak, an orange bowl of ravioli, two bowls with red sauce and spoons, a white platter of broccoli, carrots, and mushrooms

Ingredients

Coq au Vin Fondue

  • Reduced-Sodium Chicken Broth
  • Dry Red Wine, like a Burgundy wine
  • White Capped Mushrooms
  • Green Onions
  • Garlic

What to Serve with Fondue Dinner

Meat

  • Garlic Pepper Chicken
  • Teriyaki-Marinated Sirloin
  • Toasted Sesame Tuna
  • Shrimp
  • Applewood Dry-Rubbed Pork

You do not have to use all the meats I used. They can be mixed and matched, use lobster tails, salmon, or any of your favorite local meats.

A white tablecloth with a large platter of chicken, shrimp, steak, tuna, pork, and vegetables next to two red fondue pots and black plates

Vegetables

  • Small Red & Yellow Potatoes
  • Parsnips
  • White Capped Mushrooms
  • Baby Carrots
  • Broccoli

Vegetarian Options

If you need vegetarian options, substitute vegetable broth as the base. 

These are great vegetarian options to cook:

  • Mushroom-Stuffed Ravioli
  • Vegetable Potstickers or Dumplings
  • Vegetable Spring Rolls or Rice Paper Rolls
  • Asparagus
  • Sweet Potato Wedges
  • Cubes of Firm or Extra-Firm Tofu
  • Artichoke Hearts
  • Peppers 

Dipping Sauces

We have two fondue pots and the other one we typically fill 1/3 full with canola oil to fry meats in. It’s a great alternative to serve your guests.

How to Make Coq au Vin Fondue

  • Cut all meat into bite-sized cubes. Add seasonings and marinades to the meat. I recommend refrigerating for at least 30 minutes to help the seasoning stick to the meat better when it cooks in the fondue.
  • Wash and dice all produce before cooking. Heat garlic in the fondue pot and once it becomes fragrant, add chicken broth and red wine. Add in sliced mushrooms and green onions. Set the temperature to a simmer.
  • Once the pot is simmering, begin adding meat to fondue forks to cook and add vegetables with a slotted spoon to the pot.
  • Cooking times:
    • Chicken: 5 minutes
    • Beef: 2-4 minutes
    • Pork: 4-5 minutes
    • Shrimp: 3-4 minutes if using raw shrimp, about 1 minute if it’s precooked
    • Vegetables: 5-7 minutes
    • Ravioli: 3-4 minutes

You can set these timers on your phone: Melting Pot Food Timer.

Simple Fondue Etiquette:

  • Avoid eating directly off your fondue fork. The metal will be quite hot and the fork is quite sharp.
  • Don’t add raw meat to your dinner plate before cooking to avoid contaminating it. If you’re having difficulties placing it on your fork, use the edge of the dish the raw meat is in to pierce it onto the fork.
  • Each guest or family member should receive two fondue forks to cook with.
  • Make sure you keep track of which fork is yours so you know how long it has been cooking. Most forks come color-coated with two forks in each color.
  • If you are serving more than one course it’s important to give your guests fresh new fondue forks that are clean.
  • Remember to have FUN! It’s meant to be an enjoyable experience with your family and friends.
A dark plate with ravioli, vegetables, and diced meat next to two bowls of red sauce with spoons on a dark background
A fondue fork with a piece of shrimp over a red fondue pot of liquid next to bowls of vegetables, steak, chicken, and ravioli

Melting Pot’s Coq au Vin Fondue Copycat Recipe

Tiffany
This is a Melting Pot Coq au Vin fondue copycat. It's a chicken broth fondue recipe that takes the classic flavors of Coq au Vin and turns it into a fun dining experience.
4.63 from 35 votes
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 7 minutes
Total Time 37 minutes
Course Main Dishes
Cuisine Swiss
Servings 6 Servings
Calories 546 kcal

Ingredients
  

Coq au Vin Fondue

  • 32 ounces Reduced-Sodium Chicken Broth substitute vegetable broth for a vegetarian fondue
  • ½ cup Dry Red Wine such as Burgundy Wine
  • 1 tablespoon Minced Garlic
  • 2 tablespoons Finely Chopped Mushrooms
  • 2 tablespoons Finely Chopped Carrots
  • 2 tablespoons Finely Chopped Onion
  • 2 Thinly Sliced Green Onions

Meat Options (Pick Any) Cut into 1" Cubes

  • 1 pound Garlic Pepper Chicken Breast
  • 1 pound Teriyaki-Marinated Sirloin
  • 1 pound Dry Applewood Rubbed Boneless Pork Chops
  • 3 Tuna Filets tossed with toasted sesame seeds
  • 1 pound Shrimp seasoned with Salt & Pepper, peeled, veined, no tail
  • 1 pound Lobster Tail

Vegetables and Other Side Options

  • Whole Small Yellow or Red Potatoes about 2″ in diameter
  • Baby Carrots
  • Whole Mushrooms white capped or cremini
  • Broccoli Florets
  • Asparagus
  • Cubes of Firm or Extra-Firm Tofu
  • Artichoke Hearts
  • Peppers
  • Mushroom-Stuffed Ravioli
  • Vegetable Potstickers or Dumplings
  • Vegetable Spring Rolls or Rice Paper Rolls

Instructions
 

  • Wash and finely dice carrots, onion, and mushrooms. Finely slice green onion stalks.
  • Heat garlic in the fondue pot and once it becomes fragrant, add chicken broth and red wine. Add chopped mushrooms, onions, carrots, and green onions. Set the temperature to a simmer.
  • Once the pot is simmering, begin adding meat on fondue forks.
  • You can set these timers on your phone from Melting Pot:
    Melting Pot Food Timer
    Chicken: 5 minutes
    Beef: 2-4 minutes
    Pork: 4-5 minutes
    Shrimp : 3-4 minutes if using raw shrimp, about 1 minute if it's precooked
    Vegetables: 5-7 minutes
    Ravioli, Potstickers, and Spring Rolls: 3-4 minutes

Notes

  • This fondue meal uses an electric fondue pot. Be mindful of where you place the cords on your table around your plates and guests and don’t forget the extension cord.
  • Never eat directly off of fondue forks. It will be hot!
  • Do not touch dinner plates with raw meat. If I have trouble getting the raw meat to stay on my fondue fork, I like to press it against the rim of the dish it’s in so it sticks.
  • Always cut into your piece of meat to check for doneness if you are unsure.
  • For more tips read the post above.

Nutrition

Calories: 546kcalCarbohydrates: 6gProtein: 89gFat: 15gSaturated Fat: 5gPolyunsaturated Fat: 3gMonounsaturated Fat: 6gTrans Fat: 0.1gCholesterol: 298mgSodium: 347mgPotassium: 1557mgFiber: 1gSugar: 2gVitamin A: 3393IUVitamin C: 4mgCalcium: 97mgIron: 4mg

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3 Comments

    1. Hi Brie,
      A crockpot may not work as well because it needs a high enough heat to simmer as it cooks the meat and vegetables. If your crockpot has higher heat settings it could possibly work for you. Otherwise, low heat would take a lot longer to cook – not making a very fun experience.
      An Instant Pot would work since it has higher heat settings and could get you to a medium-high heat easily.
      Another alternative that would work is if you have a hot plate or freestanding burner to set a pot on in the center of your table.
      -Tiffany

4.63 from 35 votes (33 ratings without comment)

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